Carnivalia — 9/17 – 9/23/2014

The past week’s selection of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals for you:

Carnivalesque #105 (medieval history)

Carnival of Space #372

Friday Ark #490

Math Teachers at Play #78

Morsels for the Mind 19/09/2014

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The scientific tourist #332 — the Jupiter IRBM

On display at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History (in Albuquerque, New Mexico), it’s a Jupiter IRBM:

Jupiter IRBM

The Jupiter has to have one of the oddest and most confusing histories of any missile ever fielded.  And this, for a weapon that was strategically useless, nearly started World War III, and which was retired within a few years of its introduction to service.

But I’m getting ahead of myself.

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The scientific tourist #331 — The Rheintochter R I, redux

Years ago, I told you about the Rheintochter R1 (or R I) surface-to-air missile, and in particular, the example on display at the Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany.  But there’s also one of them at the National Air and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy center in Chantilly, Virginia:

Rheintochter R I Missile

The German Air Ministry started development of the Rheintochter R I in 1942, and 82 test missiles were launched from 1943 through 1944. Its planned successor (the R II) showed no improvement in performance, while only six of the next variant (R III) were ever flown before the program was cancelled in February of 1945.

The R I weighed 748 kg (1650 lbs) and was 5.9 meters (19.5 feet) long.

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Carnivalia — 9/03 – 9/09/2014

The past week’s selection of science-related blog carnivals for you:

Berry Go Round

Carnival of Space #370

Friday Ark #488

Morsels for the Mind – 05/09/2014

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The scientific tourist #330 — Mesa Verde Corrugated Gray

For your consideration this week, a large cooking pot from the ancestral puebloan site of Mesa Verde in southern Colorado (on display at the History Colorado Center in Denver):

Mesa Verde Corrugated Gray

This particular style of pot is called Mesa Verde Corrugated Gray — it’s smooth on the inside but intentionally rough on the outside.  The corrugations made the pot easier to grip and helped spread heat more evenly.  Meanwhile, the tapered neck and flared rim helped avoid boil-overs.

This pot is part of the museum’s Wetherill Collection — a cache of artifacts collected by early explorer Richard Wetherill, and purchased by the museum for $3,000 in 1889.

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Carnivalia — 8/27 – 9/02/2014

The past week’s bumper crop of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals for your reading enjoyment:

Carnival of Evolution #75

Carnival of Space #369

Friday Ark #487

History Carnival #137

Math Teachers at Play #77

Morsels for the Mind — 29/08/2014

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The scientific tourist #329 — Altar Q, Copan (top)

Last week, you got the west side of Copan’s Altar Q — today, you get to see the top:

Altar Q, Copan (top)

Altar Q is unique in that its sides present a complete list (including the names) of all the rulers in Copan’s last dynasty.  Its top hosts 36 hieroglyphs describing the origins and history of Copan’s dynastic founder, K’inich Yax K’uk’ Mo’.

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Carnivalia — 8/20 – 8/26/2014

The past week’s crop of science-related blog carnivals for your reading pleasure:

Carnival of Evolution

Carnival of Space #368

Friday Ark #486

Morsels for the mind — 22/08/2014

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The scientific tourist #328 — Altar Q, Copan (west side)

This is the west side of Altar Q, from the ancient Maya site of Copan in Honduras.  Or more accurately, it’s the west side of a very high-quality replica of the altar.

Altar Q, Copan (West side)

This altar was built in part to legitimize the reign of the 16th (and as it turned out, final) ruler of Copan.  The sides of the altar show all 16 rulers in chronological order.  This side shows Copan’s dynastic founder (the second figure from the left) passing his staff of power to the 16th ruler, Yax Pasaj Chan Yopaat.  The carving thus indicates that the 16th ruler of Copan received his right to rule directly from Copan’s founder.

This was on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science as part of the Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed traveling exhibit.

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Carnivalia — 8/13 – 8/19/2014

The past week’s selection of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals for you:

Carnival of Space #367

Friday Ark #485

Health Wonk Review, August Recess Edition

Morsels for the Mind — 15/08/2014

 

 

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