The Boneyard comes to SOS

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Welcome, one and all, to April’s edition of The Boneyard Blog Carnival! There’s plenty of good paleo-reading in store for you, so let’s jump right in…

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Making tracks, and finding them too…

This month, we’ll start with a couple of blog posts on the subject of dinosaur tracks. Project Dryptosaurus contributes The Only Surviving Cretaceous Dinosaur Track from New Jersey. Meanwhile History of geology brings us a post On the tracks of ancient mammals.

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Newbies

A few recent discoveries are in the news, too. Everything Dinosaur reports on a Sabre-Toothed Vegetarian from the Late Permian, while National Geographic’s NGM Blog Central explains an announcement in Science of a tyrannosaur bone found in Australia (maybe the next big bone rush?). Speaking of T. rex, LiveScience reports he appears to have had a Chinese cousin!

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Feeling comfortable in your skin

We’ve got a pair of posts on fossilized skin this month. Palaeoblog contributes Soft Skin Preservation In 50 Million Year Old Reptile, while a BBC News blog post tells us Prehistoric reptile skin secrets revealed in new image. Not to be left out, Superoceras contributes a pair of posts (one old, one new) on the topic of Dinosaur Color — Every kid wants to know… (Dinosaur Color Part I), and “What about bacteria?” (Dinosaur Color Part II).

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Paleoart

Lots of art on a paleo theme to gawk at this go-round. ART Evolved brings us Life’s Time Capsule: Evan Boucher’s Thoracosaurus, while Dinosaur Tracking contributes two art/paleo posts — The Amazing Race Builds a Dinosaur, and Pen and Ink Dinosaurs: Paleo. Tricia’s Obligatory Art Blog suggests Let’s read some Eye-Searingly bad Dinosaur Books for Children!

The Optimistic Painting Blog contributes Quetzalcoatlus: Big Bird goes Postal, and Shyama Golden shows off a beautiful oil painting she did (with time lapse video!) called Home Sweet Brachiosaurus.

Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week for their part posits Sauropods stomping theropods: a much neglected theme in palaeo-art.

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Creationism

If you’re in the mood for a chuckle, Creationism is always there for you. Dinochick Blogs shares a great shirt design in Creation Dragons, paleoreligiology and Altoona. Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs contributes Pareidoliasaurus, a new sauropodomorph of Utah. And the Hudson Valley Geologist brings us a post on Kachina Bridge Dinosaurs?

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Votes and surveys and such

Coherent Lighthouse wants to know Which Museums Disallow Photographs and Why? Meanwhile, ART Evolved is taking a poll on the topic for their summer gallery. If you’re in a historical mood, Louisville Fossils and Beyond contributes a post about The Great Fossil Census of 1878-79.

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Odds and ends

Anthony Maltese of the RMDRC (Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center) posts about a big jangled bunch of ceratopsian fossils his group is working on in Horn-faces and prep.

Fresh off publication of his third article, The Coastal Paleontologist brings us a pair of posts on fossil fur seals from Northern California — Part 1: discovery, and Part 2: The Gilmore Fur Seal.

Jeffrey Martz of House of Bones brings us a 3-part series on Organizing Life — consisting of Part I: What is a Species?, Part II: What Is A Genus?, and Part III: Linnean Taxonomy Puts Humans In Their Place.

Need to know more about dinosaurian dentition? Dinosaur Tracking (a Smithsonian.com blog) brings us The Tyrannosaur Tooth Toolkit.

Raptormaniacs contributes a pair of posts — A New Method for Inferring the Integument of Extinct Maniraptors, and a followup to a post in last month’s Boneyard, Singing “Raptors” Addendum.

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It’s always a pleasure to host The Boneyard — thanks for dropping by, I hope you’ve found at least a few articles of interest! The next edition will appear on May 3rd at Life as We Know It; meanwhile a few hosting spots are still open later in the year, so won’t you please consider hosting the carnival yourself too?

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