Carnivalia — 8/13 – 8/19/2014

The past week’s selection of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals for you:

Carnival of Space #367

Friday Ark #485

Health Wonk Review, August Recess Edition

Morsels for the Mind — 15/08/2014

 

 

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The scientific tourist #327 — J47 jet engine

This week, for your perusal, I present a J47 jet engine — with its casing cut open for a better view of its internal structure:

J47

In this presentation, the engine would be “flying” to the right — air is pulled in and compressed in 12 (blue) compressor stages, heated in the combustion section (the orange / red cans with holes in them), then ejected through the exhaust turbines on the left.

From the placard (at the South Dakota Air and Space Museum in Box Elder, South Dakota):

The J47 was developed by the General Electric Company from the earlier J35 engine and was first flight-tested in May 1948 as a replacement for the J35 used in the North American XF-86 “Sabre.” In September 1948, a J47 powered an F-86A to a new world’s speed record of 670.981 miles per hour. More than 30,000 engines of the basic J47 type were built before production ended in 1956. The engine was produced in at least 17 different series and was used to power such USAF aircraft as the F-86, XF-91, B-36, B-45, B-47, and XB-51.

Notably, the J47 was also the first axial-flow jet engine to be approved for use in commercial aircraft.  The last J47 was finally retired in 1978, so the design saw a full 30 years of service.

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The scientific tourist #326 — granularity

It’s been a while since I talked about White Sands National Monument — so today, let’s take a closer view of it.  Here’s a very close-up look at the sands themselves:

Granularity

As I mentioned previously,the sands of White Sands aren’t your usual white beach sand — they’re made of gypsum, dissolved by rivers from local mountains, precipitated out, then blown into dunes by the area’s prevailing winds.  In the process, the soft gypsum crystals (starting in various tabular, lenticular, and columnar shapes) are tumbled into rounded often-cylindrical shapes very different from what you’d see on a beach.

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Carnivalia — 7/30 – 8/05

The past week’s crop of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals:

Carnival of Space #365

Friday Ark #483

History Carnival #136 (some adult content)

Morsels for the Mind — 01/08/2014

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The scientific tourist #325 — the coffin of Harwa

The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago displays this coffin in an oddly understated way, packed in among a bevy of mummies and their grave goods.  It belonged to a man named Harwa, who lived in the early 7th century BC in what is now Thebes.

Coffin of Harwa

Harwa attained an office variously translated as “Grand Steward of the Divine Adoratrice” or “Chief Steward of the Divine Wife” — but recent study of his tomb has revealed that he was essentially the ruler of all of southern Egypt on behalf of the pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty.

As for Harwa’s green face — here’s what a placard has to say about it:

Green was the color of fertility, and often of the god Osiris. Painting the images of dead people with green faces showed that they had become like Osiris and would have eternal life.

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Carnivalia — 7/23 – 7/29

The past week’s selection of (mostly) science-related blog carnivals for you:

Carnivalesque #104 (history)

Carnival of Space #364

Friday Ark #482

Morsels for the Mind

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The scientific tourist #324 — Quirigua’s Stela C

Courtesy of the “Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed” traveling exhibit, it’s Stela C from the Maya site of Quiriguá in Guatemala:

Stela C, Quirigua

Well, OK — it’s actually a museum quality replica of Stela C.  Quiriguá was a medium-sized site (located in what is now southeastern Guatemala) during the Maya Classic period, attaining its greatest power and status just before the end of the Classic in the 9th century AD.

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Carnivalia — 7/10 – 7/16

The past week’s science-related blog carnivals, for your reading enjoyment:

The Carnival of Space #362

Friday Ark #480

Morsels for the Mind — 11/07/2014

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The scientific tourist #323 — Honest John

On display here (seen at the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, New Mexico) is an Honest John missile — a.k.a. an M31 (or sometimes, MGR-1):

Honest John (M31)

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The scientific tourist #322 — Natural Bridge Caverns

Should you ever find yourself driving in Texas’ hill country, you’d be well advised to spend a few hours visiting the Natural Bridge Caverns, just north of San Antonio.  It’s got a beautiful selection of cavern geology (stalactites and stalagmites and such), it’s a pretty easy walk, and photography is allowed / encouraged.

Natural Bridge entrance

Oh, yes — and there’s a limestone natural bridge, seen here at the cavern entrance, over the shoulder of our guide.

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